Paros to Athens & a Dive into History

My twentieth day in Greece began with some serious packing, oops a new bag, and a final look at my hotel before boarding my ferry to Athens. Today I was taking the slower Blue Star ferry, the trip would last about six hours, depositing me at Piraeus port mid afternoon.

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One of the great things about travelling alone is that people start up conversations with you. While waiting in the ferry queue I met a woman from the US who was with her Greek mother and two grown kids. We ended up finding a table to sit at together and I was pretty much adopted into their family for the duration of the trip. It made what could have potentially been a boring trip instead one full of stimulating conversation.

Once I arrived at Piraeus I took a train to Monastiraki and walked to my hotel. It was the same hotel I had stayed at on my first night in Greece. I was having one night there before moving into an Airbnb the following day. After a long time sitting down on the ferry I was keen to get moving so jumped on the metro and headed to the national Archaeological Museum, which was a short train ride and walk away.

Throughout my travels all over Greece I had seen at many sites notification that certain relics were in the national museum so visiting it really wrapped up some of those visits. It was a huge museum covering thousands of years of history but I was more drawn to the relics from places I had been. I won’t even pretend to have absorbed much of the history but I certainly found it a worthwhile visit.

The museum is housed in an imposing building and the first display, from the neolithic period, completely blew my mind, simply with the age of it.

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The most famous exhibit in the museum is the gold mask of Agamemnon, which probably isn’t and may even be fake. Regardless it is quite impressive.

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Like the other museums I had been in, many of the artifacts had been found at burial sites. I was again thankful to those thousands of years ago who buried a lifestyle alongside a loved one.

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There were hundreds of statues, I quickly learned how to spot Aphrodite, she was always scantily clad. And as well as Greek figures there was an extensive collection of Roman figures. It was truly a journey through time.

I took hundreds of pictures, but it really is a place to be visited to appreciate.

With that visit completed, all that was left to do was take a train back to Monastiraki, cast a quick glance at the Acropolis, and find some dinner, pastitsio. The day began on the islands and ended in the heart of the city.

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